Last edited by Mikamuro
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Market size, linkages, and productivity found in the catalog.

Market size, linkages, and productivity

Davis, Donald R.

Market size, linkages, and productivity

a study of Japanese regions

by Davis, Donald R.

  • 248 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by United Nations University, World Institute for Development Economics Research in Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Industrial productivity -- Japan.,
  • Markets -- Japan.,
  • Economies of scale -- Japan.,
  • Regional economic disparities -- Japan.,
  • Economic geography.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDonald R. Davis and David E. Weinstein.
    SeriesWIDER discussion paper
    ContributionsWeinstein, David E., World Institute for Development Economics Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination14 p. :
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20089001M
    ISBN 109291904929, 9291904937

    This timely book provides some insights by exploring the linkages among individual, group, and organizational productivity. The authors examine how to translate workers' productivity increases into gains for the entire organization, and discuss why huge investments in automation and other innovations have failed to boost productivity. The Market Access Programme The Market Access Programme sets out to strengthen the economic sustainability of black smallholder and commercial producer farms by addressing the upstream and downstream market access challenges across the value chain. Through this programme, the following services are delivered to farmers.

    Aggregate productivity and average mark-ups thus respond to both the size of a market and the extent of its integration through trade (larger, more integrated markets exhibit higher productivity. B Manufacturing's input-output linkages C MFP growth cycles for Manufacturing subsectors D Further details about subsector productivity E Sensitivity analysis of MFP estimates F Additional information on Petroleum, coal, chemical and rubber products G Additional information on Food, beverage and tobacco products

    Differences in size, sign and significance of the respective coefficients β 3 will make it possible to gauge to what extent the different technological regimes may affect the relation between firm size and R&D productivity. 4. Data and variables. The study uses data from the Survey on Business Strategies (SBS) for its empirical by: The Chan–Mountain framework is particularly effective for addressing the simultaneity between industry scale and city size productivity advantages that is an issue at the macro level of analysis.


Share this book
You might also like
naval scrapbook; first part, 1877-1900

naval scrapbook; first part, 1877-1900

Old London

Old London

Echoes from Women of the Alamo

Echoes from Women of the Alamo

Engineering economy

Engineering economy

Night stick

Night stick

Sons of the Forge

Sons of the Forge

Growth of the American republic

Growth of the American republic

Pirates and emperors, old and new

Pirates and emperors, old and new

Prophete Jonas with an introduction before teachinge to understonde him and the right use also of all the Scripture, etc., etc.

Prophete Jonas with an introduction before teachinge to understonde him and the right use also of all the Scripture, etc., etc.

Comprehensive medicinal chemistry

Comprehensive medicinal chemistry

twelfth day of July.

twelfth day of July.

Western Himalayas and Tibet

Western Himalayas and Tibet

A new description of Paris

A new description of Paris

Classification of rural holdings by size and type of activity, 1968-69

Classification of rural holdings by size and type of activity, 1968-69

Understanding television

Understanding television

Market size, linkages, and productivity by Davis, Donald R. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity A Study of Japanese Regions One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size. Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions Donald R.

Davis, David E. Weinstein. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in October NBER Program(s):Economic Fluctuations and Growth, International Trade and Investment, Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market by: Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions by Donald R.

linkages Davis Market size University and NBER and David E. Weinstein Columbia University, FRBNY, and NBER Decem Abstract: One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size.

We investigate this for forty regions of Japan. ‘productivity’ will be described below. We relate productivity to a variety of traditional variables as well as introducing new variables that stress the role of demand and cost linkages.

A first set of variables consists of various measures of market size. The simplest is ‘own-size,’ which will be represented as the regional labour force. One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size.

We investigate this for forty regions of Japan. Our results identify important effects of a region's own size, as well as cost linkages between producers and suppliers of by: Downloadable.

One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size. We investigate this for 40 regions of Japan. Our results identify important effects of a region's own size, as well as cost linkages between producers and and productivity book of inputs.

Productivity links to a more general form of 'market potential' or Marshall-Arrow-Romer externalities do not. Market Size, Trade, and Productivity MARC J. MELITZ Princeton University, NBER, and CEPR and GIANMARCO I. OTTAVIANO University of Bologna, FEEM and CEPR First version received May ; final version accepted May (Eds.) We develop a monopolistically competitive model of trade with firm heterogeneity—in terms of pro-File Size: KB.

Exploring the Linkages between Productivity and Social Development in Market Economies Abstract This paper explores the linkages between productivity and social development from the perspective of synthesizing the findings of projects undertaken by the Centre for. fundamental purposes that improve the development of market linkages for smallholder’s farmers those are: reducing transaction costs, creating production networks and developing the resources of the firm.

A Sample size of 60 is taken, the collected data has been analyzed using both File Size: KB. Market Linkages Agriculture remains the best opportunity for the estimated to 2 billion people living in smallholder households to escape poverty. Studies show that income growth generated by agriculture is up to four times more effective in reducing poverty than growth in other sectors (Growth Commission, ).

Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study Of Japanese Regions By Donald R. Davis and David E. Weinstein Get PDF ( KB)Author: Donald R. Davis and David E.

Weinstein. iii contents. reface v. acknowledgements. summary vii. 1 introduction 1. 2 types of market linkage 5. 3 identifying profitable markets 4 factors affecting the success of linkages introduction initiating linkages. working with the private sector.

capacity of the linking organization is vitalFile Size: KB. Selling market information and research services is a second type of business common in the market linkage model. Unlike the market intermediary model, this type of social enterprise does not sell or market clients' products; rather it connects clients to markets.

The market linkage model can be either embedded or integrated. Get this from a library. Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions. [Donald R Davis; David E Weinstein] -- One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size.

We investigate this for forty regions of Japan. Our results identify important effects of a region's. Get this from a library.

Market size, linkages, and productivity: a study of Japanese regions. [Donald R Davis; David E Weinstein; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper examines the relationship between firms’ productivity improvement and the volume of exports, and shows that it can be sometimes negative, which seems to be an empirical puzzle.

The key lies in that we simultaneously take into account intermediate retailers (i.e. vertically) and multimarket linkages (i.e. horizontally). BibTeX @MISC{Davis01notice,is, author = {Donald R. Davis and David E. Weinstein and Donald R. Davis and David E.

Weinstein and Donald R. Davis and David E. Weinstein}, title = {notice, is given to the source. Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions}, year = {}}. Linkages Strong and dynamic vertical linkages are critical to the long-term competitiveness of value chains, as well as to the inclusion of small to medium scale producers in those networks.

These linkages are the primary mechanism through which producers learn about changing market requirements. And it is through vertical linkages, in the form. Measuring Economic Growth and Productivity: Foundations, KLEMS Production Models, and Extensions presents new insights into the causes, mechanisms and results of growth in national and regional accounts.

It demonstrates the versatility and usefulness of the KLEMS databases, which generate internationally comparable industry-level data on. I'll restrict the data to the enterprise market.

Online collaboration tools / enterprise social are loosely used to denote the same class of software suites, whether on premise or delivered over the cloud. Annual revenues for vendors in this spac. Topic Guide Making Market Linkages Katie Clancy Sasha Parameswaran Mark Thomas Nathan Associates London Ltd.

September Making Market Linkages Topic Guide i EPS-PEAKS is a consortium of organisations that provides Economics and Private Sector Professional EvidenceFile Size: 1MB.As defined in Chapter 1, productivity is the ratio of output to input in a production process.

Total factor productivity considers all inputs used to produce the l factor productivity refers to the ratio of output to a single input (Mahoney, ), for example, labor productivity. While measures of partial factor productivity are useful in certain contexts, they provide an.Chapter 2 outlines a framework for understanding market linkages: 1.

It defines what market linkages are. 2. It describes the types of intermediaries that are involved with marketing. 3. It describes the main marketing channels. 4. It outlines the relationship between marketing, transport and accessibility.

5.